Prediction for 2024

React as Template Engine

Server side rendering has been a hot topic in the React community for a while now. It's a technique that allows you to render your React application on the server and send the HTML to the client, which can then be hydrated into a fully functional React application. This can be beneficial for a number of reasons, including improved performance, better SEO, and more reliable user experiences.

Next.js has been a popular choice for server side rendering in the React world, with it's introduction of server-actions which for the most part reminds us of the good old days of PHP. To expand on this concept, PHP has been used to send event driven actions to the server, whereby a PHP script would be executed and the server would respond accordingly. This is a concept that has been around for a while, and it's interesting to see it being brought back into the modern web development world. In fact, SSR was the status quo for web development before the advent of single page applications. If you remember, .NET and PHP were the most popular server side languages around the time of the early 2000s.

Basically, the idea is that you can use server side rendering to render your React application on the server and send the HTML to the client, which can then be hydrated into a fully functional React application. This can be beneficial for a number of reasons, including improved performance, better SEO, and more reliable user experiences.

Thus, React as a template engine is a concept that is gaining traction. That's why very soon we might even start seeing React as a template engine in the same way that we see PUG, EJS, and Handlebars.

Rust and WebAssembly

Rust is a systems programming language that is focused on safety, speed, and concurrency. It's a language that has been gaining a lot of traction in the web development world, and for good reason. Rust is by far one of the most exciting languages to come out in the last few years, and it's a language that is being used in a wide variety of applications, from systems programming to web development.

WebAssembly is a new standard that is being developed by the W3C, and it's a way to run code in the browser that is written in languages other than JavaScript. This is a big deal, because it means that you can write code in languages like C, C++, and Rust, and run that code in the browser. This opens up a whole new world of possibilities for web development, and it's something that is going to have a big impact on the way that we build web applications in the future.

Rust and WebAssembly are a match made in heaven, and it's a combination that is starting to be embraced by developers slowly. Although, it won't be long before we start seeing a lot more Rust and WebAssembly in the web development world it's a concept that has it's benefits.

Rust in Serverless and Cloud Native Applications

Go has been the language of choice for cloud native applications for a while now, and for good reason. It's a language that is designed for building fast, reliable, and efficient software, and it's a language that has been embraced by a wide variety of companies, from startups to large enterprises. However, Rust is a language that is starting to gain a lot of traction in the cloud native world, and it's a language that is starting to be embraced by a wide variety of companies, from startups to large enterprises.

Rust is fast, and more importantly memory safe. This means, reduced cold start times, and reduced memory usage. This is a big deal for cloud native applications, and it's something that is going to have a big impact on the way that we build cloud native applications in the future.

I was at the library and noticed a student who was attending a lecture on Rust by University of New South Wales. After initial conversation, I found out that the university has started to include Rust in their curriculum. In fact, it was the first time this unit was being taught. Mind, that this was a university that was known for it's strong computer science program in Australia.

This is a sign that Rust is starting to be embraced by the academic world, and it's a language that is going to have a big impact on the way that we build cloud native applications in the future.

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